AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. April 2007, Volume 9, Number 4: 327-329.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: Professional Development in Medical School.

Felice Aull, PhD, MA, is an associate professor at New York University School of Medicine, where she teaches medical humanities electives and edits The Literature, Arts, and Medicine Database, a Web resource that she founded in 1993. Her research interests include borderland and exile states and narratives, illness narratives, and the work of physician writers.

Amar D. Bansal is a second-year medical student at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. He graduated with a degree in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005, where he was involved in tissue engineering research of intervertebral disc cells. Mr. Bansal conducted electrophysiology research on retinal pigment epithelial cells at the National Eye Institute in 2006. He is interested in improving health care access for those in medically underserved communities and is president of the Patient Advocacy Group at NYU.

Flauren Fagadau Bender, JD, is an associate at Stewart Stimmel LLP, a health care law firm in Dallas. Her practice focuses on operational, regulatory and transactional issues. She received her JD in 2005 from the University of Texas School of Law in Austin.

Jaclyn H. Bonder, MD, graduated from New York University (NYU) School of Medicine in 2005 and is a resident in physical medicine and rehabilitation at NYU Medical Center in New York City.

Laurie T. Cohen, JD, is a partner with the Health Law Group at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP, in its Albany, New York, office. She was the governmental relations counsel to the Medical Society of the State of New York for more than 10 years. Ms. Cohen regularly counsels health care professionals on a broad array of health care issues.

Autumn Lynn Edenfield is a fourth-year medical student at New York University (NYU) in New York City. She will begin a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at NYU in July 2007.

David S. Goldfarb, MD, is the clinical chief of nephrology at New York University (NYU) Medical Center, chief of the Nephrology Section at New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and a professor of medicine and physiology at NYU School of Medicine, all in New York City.

Frederic W. Hafferty, PhD, is a professor of behavioral sciences at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis. He is the author of two books and is currently working on two more. The first (with Brian Castellani) is on the sociology of complexity, and the second is on the hidden curriculum in medical education. He is the associate editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior and sits on the Association of American Medical Colleges' Council of Academic Societies.

Mark S. Hochberg, MD, is a professor of surgery at New York University School of Medicine in New York City.

Mary Ann Hopkins, MD, is a laparoscopic surgeon at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. She is an assistant professor of surgery, the director of surgical education and curriculum design, and the associate clerkship director for surgery. She has developed self-contained, Web-based surgery teaching modules called WISE-MD, which emphasize professionalism, communication skills and critical decision making.

Adina Kalet, MD, MPH, is an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. She serves as a medical education advisor to the Department of Surgery and as faculty adviser for the Professional Development Committee, a student-led professionalism initiative. Dr. Kalet conducts medical education research on ensuring that competent physicians are prepared to serve as primary care physicians for medically underserved communities. She has published on communication skills, clinical reasoning, computer-based learning and professionalism. And she loves to teach.

Jason M. LaFlam, JD, is an associate with the Health Law Group at Wilson, Elser, Moskowitz, Edelman & Dicker LLP, in its Albany, New York, office.

Thomas LeBlanc, MD, MA, is a 2006 graduate of the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina. While at Duke he also earned a master's degree in philosophy, focusing on topics in medical ethics. Dr. LeBlanc recently began his internship in internal medicine at Duke University and has career interests in palliative care, oncology, medical ethics, medical education and literature in medicine.

Deirdre Masterton, MD, graduated from New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and is a third-year obstetrics and gynecology resident at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island.

David E. Seubert, MD, JD, is director of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. He is also director of the medical student clerkship program in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Seubert's interests include undergraduate medical education and outcome studies using databases.

David Stevens, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at New York University in New York City.

Theme issue editors

Miriam Fishman is a fourth-year medical student at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine and will be starting her residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City in July 2007. She has been part of the professional development committee at NYU School of Medicine since her first year. Miriam graduated from Yale University in 2002 with a BA in History.

Alfred Garfall is spending a year doing research in cancer biology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and will return to New York University School of Medicine in August 2007 as a fourth-year student where he has been involved in developing and implementing the professionalism curriculum. He graduated from Princeton University in 2002 with a degree in molecular biology.

Justin Michael Thomas is a fourth-year medical student at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, where he has worked with the Professionalism Development Committee to promote commitment to incorporating professional development evaluation in the medical school curriculum. Justin will be pursuing residency training in neurological surgery at State University of New York (SUNY)-Buffalo beginning in July 2007. He graduated from New York University magna cum laude in neural science in 2003.


The viewpoints expressed on this site are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the AMA.