AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. December 2007, Volume 9, Number 12: 854-857.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics and Public Health: Physicians as Agents of the State

Theme Issue Editor

Siddharth Srivastava, is a second-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. He completed a degree in biochemistry at Columbia University, where he became interested in the intersection of health policy, education, and ethics. This summer, he conducted research on the use of diffusion tensor imaging to better detect the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and he hopes to continue his research career in academic medicine.

Contributors

Clarissa G. Barnes is a fourth-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. She intends to pursue residency training in internal medicine. Her research interest focuses on public health policy, especially as it relates to chronic and infectious disease epidemics.

Ronald Bayer, PhD, is a professor of public health and codirector of the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University in New York City. He has worked extensively on AIDS issues related to the ethics of public health. He is a coauthor of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America (University of California Press, 2007).

Lee Black, JD, LLM, is a senior research associate for the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs at the American Medical Association in Chicago. Prior to joining the AMA, he was a staff attorney with the Legislative Reference Bureau in Springfield, where he drafted legislation for the Illinois General Assembly.

Frederick L. Brancati, MD, MHS, is a professor of medicine and epidemiology and director of the General Internal Medicine Division at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. His research focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of type 2 diabetes and related conditions.

Benjamin Caballero, MD, PhD, is a professor of international health and of pediatrics at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. His research interest is childhood obesity, both in the U.S. and in developing countries.

James Colgrove, PhD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University in New York City. His research examines the relationship between individual rights and the collective well-being and the social, political, and legal processes through which public health policies have been mediated in American history. He is the author of State of Immunity: The Politics of Vaccination in Twentieth-Century America (University of California Press, 2006) and coauthor of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America (University of California Press, 2007).

Amy Fairchild, PhD, MPH, is an associate professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences and assistant director for scholarly and academic affairs at the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University in New York City. Her work addresses broad questions about the functions and limit of state action in the realm of public health. She is a coauthor of Searching Eyes: Privacy, the State, and Disease Surveillance in America (University of California Press, 2007).

Tiffany L. Gary, PhD, MHS, is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. She also holds a joint appointment in the General Internal Medicine Division at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is a core faculty member in the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research and the Center for Health Disparities Solutions. Dr. Gary's current research program includes social epidemiology, advanced statistical methods, and the content areas of diabetes and obesity.

Kimberly Horn, EdD, MSW, is the Robert C. Byrd associate professor in the Department of Community Medicine at West Virginia University in Morgantown. She is also associate director of population health research at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center and director of the Translational Tobacco Reduction Research Program at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center in the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center in Morgantown.

James E. Kelley, PhD, is a second-year medical student at the University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham (UAB). He earned a PhD in the Department of Pathology at the University of Cambridge in England, and currently works as a consultant researcher for the Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology at UAB, focusing on the genetic and functional basis of autoimmunity. James plans to pursue a career in academic medicine.

Sarah Lusk is a second-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. Her research interests include the patient-physician relationship in the context of immigration and barriers to care experienced by children who are taken to the emergency department with psychiatric complaints by their families. She plans to pursue a career in pediatrics or family medicine, with a particular focus on patient care and teaching.

Sonal S. Munsiff, MD, is director of the New York City Tuberculosis (TB) Control Program in the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. She is also a medical officer in the Division of TB Elimination in the National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Munsiff is interested in the epidemiology and treatment of drug-resistant TB, clinical aspects of TB in HIV-infected persons, the global epidemiology of TB, particularly as it affects New York City, and the challenges of identifying and treating persons with latent TB infection who are at high risk of developing the disease.

David Pitrak, MD, is a professor of medicine at University of Chicago and chief of the infectious diseases section at University of Chicago Hospitals. Dr. Pitrak is interested in new therapies for new HIV infection, translational research on immune pathogenesis of HIV infection, immune reconstitution in HIV infection, neutrophil function, and immune defects and risk for infection in transplantation.

Dorothy Porter, PhD, is a professor in the history of health sciences and chair of the Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Her last monograph, Health, Civilisation and the State: A History of Public Health from Ancient to Modern Times, was published by Routledge in 1999. She is currently researching new methods for evaluating translational biomedical scientific collaboration and is writing a history of the evolution of social medicine in the 20th century.

Carolyn J. Sachs, MD, MPH, is an associate professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and practices at the UCLA Emergency Medicine Center in Los Angeles. Her research interests include sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and mandatory reporting.

Keerti V. Shah, MD, DrPH, is a professor of microbiology and immunology in the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. He is a virologist with a primary research interest in human papillomavirus and polyomavirus infections.

Cindy Tworek, PhD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy at West Virginia University's School of Pharmacy in Morgantown, and she is a core investigator in the Translational Tobacco Reduction Research Program at the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center in the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center in Morgantown. Her research interests include tobacco control, health policy, health behavior, and health services research—including efforts to effectively translate research into practice to improve health outcomes and enhance prevention practices within communities.

Raphael P. Viscidi, MD, is a professor of pediatrics in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. He is an infectious diseases specialist with a primary research interest in human papillomavirus infections.