AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. February 2008, Volume 10, Number 2: 130-132.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Caring for the Incarcerated Patient

Theme Issue Editor

Sarah Lee is a second-year medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. She received a bachelor of arts degree in comparative literature from Columbia University in 2001 and worked as an editor for The Paris Review and Random House before applying to medical school. She has particular interest in working with underserved communities, both in the United States and abroad.

Contributors

Ellena Bennett is a member of the Institutional Review Board at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City, and a masters student in the bioethics program of Union Graduate College and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in Schenectady, New York, and New York City. Her current research is in designing affect-centered teaching modalities for the bioethics training of clinical research scientists. She plans to pursue a doctorate in philosophy.

Lee Black, JD, LLM, is a senior research associate for the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs at the American Medical Association in Chicago. Prior to joining the AMA, he was a staff attorney with the Legislative Reference Bureau in Springfield, where he drafted legislation for the Illinois General Assembly.

Andrew M. Cameron, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and maintains a laboratory where he pursues molecular understandings of the hepatitis C virus. He completed his surgical training at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and received liver transplant training at UCLA.

Julia Dombrowski, MD, MPH, is a fellow in infectious diseases at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. She was the Virtual Mentor theme issue editor in May 2004.

Robert E. Fullilove, EdD, is the associate dean for community and minority affairs and professor of clinical sociomedical sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York City. He codirects the Community Research Group at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University. He is also a codirector of a newly formed degree program in Urbanism and the built environment in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health.

Jamie S. Hirsch is a fourth-year medical student at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and a masters student in the bioethics program of Union Graduate College and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in Schenectady, New York, and New York City. His current research is in the progression of—and racial disparities in the progression of—chronic kidney disease and in assessing and optimizing bioethics education and curriculum in medical schools.

E. Bernadette McKinney, JD, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow with the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Her current research addresses the legal, ethical, and public policy issues in correctional health care. She is the current editor of the Texas Medical Jurisprudence Examination: A Self-Study Guide.

Jeffrey L. Metzner, MD, is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver. He has provided consultation to judges, special masters, monitors, state departments of corrections, city and county jails, the U.S. Department of Justice, the National Prison Project, and others involved in the field of correctional psychiatry in more than 30 states. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Ethical Considerations for Revisions to Department of Health and Human Services Regulations for Protection of Prisoners Involved in Research.

Owen J. Murray, DO, MBA, is the assistant vice president for the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Community Health Services Division and chief physician executive for UTMB Correctional Managed Care. Dr. Murray is also an assistant professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at UTMB in Galveston.

Kenrad E. Nelson, MD, is a professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore. He is interested in rates of hepatitis C infection in Far Eastern countries and in the study of hepatitis C virus in incarcerated populations in this country.

Nancy Neveloff Dubler, LLB, is the director of the Division of Bioethics in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center and professor of bioethics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. She lectures extensively and is the author of numerous articles and books on termination of care, home care and long-term care, geriatrics, adolescent medicine, prison and jail health care, and AIDS. Ms. Dubler is codirector of the certificate program in bioethics and the medical humanities, conducted jointly by Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Cardozo Law School of Yeshiva University in New York City.

Joseph E. Paris, PhD, MD, is a chemist turned medical doctor. He entered correctional medicine through the Florida Department of Corrections in 1985 and was the first Florida correctional physician to prescribe AZT to an inmate. Dr. Paris retired from Department of Corrections work at the end of 2005 and began part-time public health work with HIV patients. He is a founding member and past president of the Society of Correctional Physicians, past president of the Florida chapter of the American Correctional Health Services Association, and a board member of the Certified Correctional Healthcare Professionals and the Correctional Medical Institute.

Aruna K. Subramanian, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor of surgery in the Infectious Diseases Division at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, where she focuses on opportunistic infections in organ transplant recipients. Her other research interests include transplantation in the HIV-positive recipient.

Mark S. Sulkowski, MD, is an associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and has extensive experience in the clinical management of patients with hepatitis B and C infection, especially in those who are co-infected with HIV. He organizes and participates in numerous large, multicenter trials of therapy for hepatitis C virus infection.

David L. Thomas, MD, MPH, is the chief of the Infectious Diseases Division at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. His areas of interest and expertise are hepatitis B and C and the role of HIV in promoting liver disease. His research focuses on understanding HIV-related liver disease.

Howard J. Worman, MD, is a professor of medicine and pathology and cell biology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, where he lectures about the liver and liver disease to first- and second-year medical students and mentors gastroenterology fellows in the Liver Clinic. His academic activities are divided between basic research, medical education, and the care of patients with liver diseases.