AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. September 2009, Volume 11, Number 9: 741-743.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethical Questions in Genetic Testing

Theme Issue Editor

Bennett William Clark is a fourth-year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, and is applying for residency in internal medicine. He graduated from Yale with a bachelorís degree in philosophy.

Contributors

Emily E. Anderson, PhD, MPH, is a project director at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Institute for Health Research and Policy. She received her doctorate in health care ethics from Saint Louis University in 2007 and her masterís degree from UIC in 2000. She is a former AMA ethics fellow.

Roberto Andorno, JD, JSD, is a senior research fellow at the Institute of Biomedical Ethics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Adrienne Asch, PhD, is the Edward and Robin Milstein Professor of Bioethics at Yeshiva University in New York City, and the director of the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University. She is the author of many articles on reproductive ethics, bioethics, disability, and feminism. Much of her work has focused on ethical issues in prenatal testing.

Don B. Bailey, Jr., PhD, is a fellow at RTI International. He directs several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on various aspects of fragile X syndrome and broader issues surrounding the ethical, legal, and social consequences of genetic discoveries and the disclosure of genetic information to families, especially in the context of newborn screening.

Wylie Burke, MD, PhD, is professor and chair of the Department of Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is also principal investigator of the University of Washington Center for Genomics and Healthcare Equality, an NIH-funded Center of Excellence in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research.

Bernard M. Dickens, PhD, LLP, is professor emeritus of health law and policy at the Faculty of Law, Faculty of Medicine, and Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto. He is a former president of the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics, and serves on the editorial boards of several medico-legal journals. Dr. Dickens is departmental editor for ethics and health policy of the American Journal of Public Health.

Leon Dure, MD, is the division chief of pediatric neurology in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alabama School of Medicine at Birmingham. He is also the William Bew White Jr. Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Alabama and director of the Huntingtonís Disease Center of Excellence at the Childrenís Hospital of Alabama.

Tali Geva, MS, CGC, is a genetic counselor in the GenRISK Adult Genetics Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Ms. Geva received a bachelorís degree in genetics/developmental biology at Penn State University and a masterís degree in genetic counseling at California State University, Northridge. She is an active member of the American Society of Human Genetics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

Ora Gordon, MD, MS, is director of the GenRISK Adult Genetics Program and a member of the Saul and Joyce Brandman Breast Center and the Thyroid Cancer Center at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. She is also an assistant clinical professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Shane K. Green, PhD, is the director of outreach and lead GE3LS (genomics-related ethical, economic, environmental, legal, and social issues) advisor at the Ontario Genomics Institute in Toronto. He has a doctorate in medical biophysics from the University of Toronto (U of T) and has studied and taught bioethics and research ethics through the U of T Joint Centre for Bioethics and the American Medical Associationís Institute for Ethics. He has served on the research ethics boards of two major health research centres in Toronto, and is a member of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Stem Cell Oversight Committee.

Robert Klitzman, MD, is the director of the Ethics and Policy Core of the HIV Center in New York City, and cofounded the Columbia University Center for Bioethics. He is the director of the master of bioethics program being established at Columbia, and a member of the Division of Psychiatry, Law and Ethics in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Klitzman is the author of Being Positive: The Lives of Men and Women with HIV and Mortal Secrets: Truth and Lies in the Age of AIDS, among others. He was the recipient of a Mentored Clinical Scientist Award (K08) from the National Institute of Mental Health, and received several awards for his work, including fellowships from the Russell Sage Foundation, Commonwealth Fund, and Rockefeller Foundation.

Anne-Marie Laberge, MD, PhD, is a medical geneticist at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Sainte-Justine and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Universite de Montreal. Her research addresses the use of genetic tests in clinical practice and how they influence management of patient care.

Kelly E. Ormond, MS, CGC, is a board-certified genetic counselor, an associate professor, and director of the masterís program in human genetics at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. She is a past president of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

Anam Pal is a third-year medical student at the Agha Khan University Medical College in Karachi, Pakistan.

Lubna Pal, MBBS, MSc, is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

Cynthia Powell, MD, MS, is an associate professor of pediatrics and genetics, and chief of the Division of Genetics and Metabolism in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A medical geneticist and trained genetic counselor, Dr. Powell oversees the medical genetics residency program and the pediatric genetic clinic at UNC-CH.

Myra I. Roche, MS, CGC, is a certified genetic counselor and associate professor in the Division of Genetics and Metabolism in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her clinical and research interests include improving familiesí understanding of genetic information and the ethical implications of genetic testing.

Kristin E. Schleiter, JD, LLM, is a senior research associate for the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs for the American Medical Association in Chicago. She analyzes ethics policy and law and assists in the development and dissemination of ethics policy and related educational material. Ms. Schleiter received both her law degree and masters of law in health law from Loyola University Chicago School of Law, where she was a contributing writer for the Annals of Health Law.

Debra Skinner, PhD, is a senior scientist at the FPG Child Development Institute and an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approaches to the study of human development and families of children with disabilities.

Mike Spear is the director of corporate communications for Genome Alberta, a not-for-profit organization that funds and manages genomics research. He is a former journalist with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and speaks extensively on the use of social media in public relations and journalism. His genome has been sequenced by four direct-to-consumer testing companies, and the results have been posted on the web.

David Wasserman, JD, is a research scholar at the University of Marylandís Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy and the director of research at the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University. He works on ethical and policy issues in disability, genetics, and reproduction.

Ariel Williams is a fourth-year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California. She graduated from Yale University in 2003 with a bachelorís degree in philosophy.