AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. April 2010, Volume 12, Number 4: 353-356.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Medical Ethics Confronts Obesity

Theme Issue Editor

Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, MPH, is a second-year resident in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine/Palmetto Health. Dr. Stanford received her MD from the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine. She served as a health communications fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and worked as a behavioral sciences intern at the American Cancer Society. Dr. Stanford recently completed a medicine and media internship at the Discovery Channel, she is a journalist for LiveStrong.com, and she reviews articles for the Journal of the National Medical Association. An American Medical Association Foundation leadership award recipient, she was selected for the Paul Ambrose Award for national leadership among resident physicians in 2009. Dr. Stanford would like to pursue an academic career in obesity medicine.

Contributors

Nadia N. Ahmad, MD, MPH, is a third-year obesity medicine and nutrition fellow at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. She is a graduate of the New York University School of Medicine and received an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She completed her residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Her clinical interests focus on the development of new pharmacologic therapies for obesity, and her research aims to understand the role of bile acids in the regulation of energy balance.

Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, was the 17th surgeon general of the United States (2002-2006). He is currently a distinguished professor at the University of Arizona’s Zuckerman College of Public Health. His professional interests include protecting, promoting, and advancing the health, safety, and security of the United States. As surgeons general say, “Once a surgeon general, always a surgeon general."

Lawrence J. Cheskin, MD, is associate professor of health, behavior and society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, with joint appointments in the human nutrition program of the Bloomberg School’s Department of International Health and in medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He graduated from Dartmouth Medical School and completed a fellowship in gastroenterology at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He founded and directs the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, a comprehensive treatment program for obesity. In his research, Dr. Cheskin has studied the effects of medications on body weight, how cigarette smoking relates to dieting and body weight, and the effectiveness of lifestyle and dietary changes in weight loss and weight maintenance.

Gail Geller, ScD, MHS, is a professor in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and core faculty in the Berman Institute of Bioethics. She has joint appointments in the Department of Pediatrics and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Geller is a social scientist and ethicist whose research focuses on communication, decision making, and well-being of patients, families, and clinicians under emotionally challenging conditions such as diagnostic uncertainty, cultural differences, power imbalances, and life-threatening illness.

Colleen Gillespie, PhD, is a community psychologist and an assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine. Her research interests include the intersection of medical education and health services research, performance-based assessment, and the role of the doctor-patient interaction in facilitating healthy behavior and behavior change. She is a member of the Research on Medical Education Outcomes team at NYU (http://prmeir.med.nyu.edu/research-1), a multidisciplinary collaboration of medical education researchers seeking to enhance the evidence base for medical education by building links between education and patient outcomes.

Melanie Jay, MD, MS, is a primary care internist and an assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine. Her research and clinical interests focus on improving the prevention and treatment of obesity in primary care. She is a member of the Research on Medical Education Outcomes team at NYU (http://prmeir.med.nyu.edu/research-1), a multidisciplinary collaboration of medical education researchers seeking to enhance the evidence base for medical education by building links between education and patient outcomes.

Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, is the associate director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center and core faculty in the General Preventive Medicine Residency Program at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He specializes in public health aspects of obesity and clinical weight management.

Audiey C. Kao, MD, PhD, is a 6-foot, 1-1/2-inch tall Chinese-American and the vice president of the ethics group at the American Medical Association.

Lee M. Kaplan, MD, PhD, is the director of the MGH Weight Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital and an associate professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is also the director of the Obesity Medicine and Nutrition Fellowship Program at MGH. Dr. Kaplan received his MD and PhD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He completed his residency in internal medicine and fellowship in gastroenterology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He has particular interests in the treatment of obesity and its metabolic complications, including fatty liver disease, and his research focuses on the gastrointestinal regulation of energy balance and metabolic function.

Nancy F. Krebs, MD, MS, is a professor and head of the nutrition section in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine and the medical director of the clinical nutrition department at the Children’s Hospital in Aurora, Colorado. Her research interests include infant and child nutrition, including complementary feeding and micronutrient requirements. Among her clinical interests are growth faltering and the prevention and treatment of obesity.

Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc, is the clinical director of the Cardiovascular Health Clinic and the director of the Cardiometabolic Program at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He is an associate professor of medicine at the Mayo College of Medicine. He is also a member of the obesity committee of the American Heart Association’s Council of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism. His research interests include the complex relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Drew McCormick, MA, is a second-year law student at Loyola University Chicago, where she is a Beazley Institute health law fellow, a member of the Annals of Health Law journal staff, the president of the Health Law Society, and a member of the board of the Loyola chapter of the National Lawyers Guild. She also has a master’s degree in bioethics and health policy, an area in which she enjoys participating in scholarship outside of law school.

Robin A. McKinnon, PhD, MPA, is a health policy specialist at the National Cancer Institute. Her research interests include the economic and social effects of rising obesity rates at the population level, evaluation of public policies that may affect diet and activity behavior, measurement of the food and physical activity environments, and the effects of these environments on individual behavior. Dr. McKinnon earned her PhD in public policy and public administration, with a concentration in health policy, at the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and her MPA from Harvard University.

William R. Miranda, MD, is a research fellow in cardiovascular diseases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Nia Mitchell, MD, is a fellow in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado Denver. Her interests are in disease prevention and health promotion, including obesity treatment. She is currently studying the effectiveness of nonprofit weight-loss programs.

Pamela M. Peeke, MD, MPH, is assistant professor of medicine and Pew Foundation scholar in nutrition and metabolism at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She is global spokesperson for the American College of Sports Medicine’s Exercise is Medicine campaign, chief medical correspondent for Discovery Health TV, and WebMD’s lifestyle and fitness expert.

Barry M. Popkin, MS, PhD, is the Carla Smith Chamblee Distinguished Professor of Global Nutrition at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He directs the UNC-CH’s Interdisciplinary Center for Obesity and works intensively in both the biomedical and social science arenas on a global basis. He developed the concept of the “nutrition transition” using his series of U.S. and international cohort studies of the factors underlying dietary and physical activity/inactivity patterns and their effects on health.

Natasha Schvey is a second-year doctoral student in clinical psychology at Yale University in New Haven. She received her bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University in English and psychology. Her research interests include obesity, weight stigma, binge eating, and eating in response to negative affect.

Adam Gilden Tsai, MD, MSCE, is an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado Denver. His research interests include treatment of obesity with diet, behavior modification, and pharmacotherapy. He also studies health services issues related to obesity treatment, including racial and socioeconomic disparities, and the economics of obesity and weight management.

Todd Varness, MD, MPH, is assistant professor of pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison. In addition to his clinical practice, he conducts research in ethical issues in pediatric endocrinology and the ethical and policy aspects of newborn screening.

John Whyte, MD, MPH, serves as the chief medical expert for Discovery Channel. In this role, he develops, designs, and delivers educational programming for both medical and lay audiences. Prior to Discovery, Dr. Whyte was a senior official at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. He has written extensively on health policy in both the medical and consumer press.