AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. July 2011, Volume 13, Number 7: 517-520.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Physician Authors

Theme Issue Editor

Rimma Osipov is a third-year medical student and a PhD candidate in the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She received her BA in history from UCLA in 2006. Her research interests include history of medicine, literature and medicine, and, particularly, medical education.

Contributors

Emily Amos is a third-year medical student at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where she is in the scholarly concentration program in medical humanities and ethics. She received her undergraduate degree in public health from the University of Washington in 2006 and spent three years researching malaria vaccine development before starting medical school.

Jay Baruch, MD, is an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where he also serves as director of the medical ethics curriculum. He is the author of a collection of short fiction, Fourteen Stories: Doctors, Patients, and Other Strangers (Kent State University Press, 2007). His academic interests include pragmatic medical humanities.

Janine Bernardo is a recent graduate from The College of New Jersey with degrees in biology and gender studies. She is studying medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine and pursuing an MPH from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and is interested in an academic career in womenís health or pediatric medicine.

Elena Bezzubova, MD, PhD, is a practicing psychoanalyst at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles and an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine. Her scholarly interests are personalization and depersonalization, the doctor-patient relationship, the psychology of health care professionals, and philosophical and moral aspects of medicine.

Valarie Blake, JD, MA, is the senior research associate for the American Medical Associationís Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Ms. Blake completed the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics, received her law degree with a certificate in health law and concentrations in bioethics and global health from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and obtained a masterís in bioethics from Case Western Reserve University. Her research focuses on ethical and legal issues in assisted reproductive technology and reproductive tissue transplants, as well as regulatory issues in research ethics.

Howard Brody, MD, PhD, is the John P. McGovern Centennial Chair in Family Medicine and director of the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. His most recent book is The Future of Bioethics (Oxford, 2009).

Eric Coble, MFA, is a playwright and screenwriter. He is a member of the Playwrightsí Unit of the Cleveland Play House in Ohio. Before turning to playwriting, Eric received his BA in English from Fort Lewis College in Colorado and his MFA in acting from Ohio University. His plays have been performed nationally and internationally.

Russell J. Coletti is a third-year student at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill.

Jack Coulehan, MD, MPH, is a physician, poet, and senior fellow of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University in New York. His latest collection of poems is Bursting with Danger and Music (Plain View Press, 2011).

G. Thomas Couser, PhD, retired in 2011 from Hofstra University on Long Island, New York, where he was a professor of English and founding director of the disability studies program. His books include Recovering Bodies: Illness, Disability, and Life Writing (Wisconsin, 1997), Vulnerable Subjects: Ethics and Life Writing (Cornell, 2004), and Signifying Bodies: Disability in Contemporary Life Writing (Michigan, 2009).

Daniel Huck is an MD/MPH candidate at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and is pursuing a career at the intersection of medicine and public health. Through experience in the public health field and earning a bachelor of science in physics, he has learned the importance of integrating the social and scientific sides of medicine.

Judy L. Kantrowitz, PhD, is a training and supervising analyst at Boston Psychoanalytic Institute and a clinical associate professor at Harvard Medical School. She is the author of two books, The Patientís Impact on the Analyst and Writing about Patients: Responsibilities, Risks, and Ramifications, and papers on the effect of the patient-analyst match on outcome of psychoanalysis and impasses in analysis.

Martin Kohn, PhD, is director of the program in medical humanities in the Center for Ethics, Humanities and Spiritual Care at Cleveland Clinic and associate professor of medicine at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. His research interests are in the pedagogical aspects of the medical humanities and in developing performance pieces that engage health care professionals and the public in dialogue about the nature and future of health care.

Ronald Koons, MD, is a professor emeritus in the Department of Medicine at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine. His research interests include biomedical ethics and patient-centered care and their implications for mind-body medicine.

Christopher Langston is a medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester and a PhD candidate in ethics at the University of Toronto. His doctoral work is on clarifying the concept of quality of life as it is used in medicine.

Tom Linden, MD, is a professor of medical journalism and director of the Medical and Science Journalism Program at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Lindenís latest book is The New York Times Reader: Health and Medicine, published by CQ Press (2011). He writes about health care politics, economics, and the media for Dr. Tom Lindenís Health Blog at http://weblogs.jomc.unc.edu/healthblog.

Ronald Pies, MD, is a professor of psychiatry and lecturer on bioethics and humanities at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, and clinical professor of psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston.

Thomas Robey, MD, PhD, is an emergency medicine resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He has written columns for Medscape, blogged on his own sites and as a guest author, and edited the June 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor. Dr. Robey is funded by the Greenwall Foundation to study informed consent and radiation from imaging in the emergency department. He serves on the ethics committee of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

Susan Sample, MFA, is a program associate in the Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, where she teaches reflective writing to medical students and facilitates literature discussions with physicians. She is also a doctoral student in communication and rhetoric, researching the role of physician narratives in end-of-life conversations.

Ankoor Shah is a fourth-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and is pursuing a masterís in public health with a concentration in epidemiology at Emoryís Rollins School of Public Health. His career interests include pediatrics and global health.

Johanna Shapiro, PhD, is a professor of family medicine and director of the Program in Medical Humanities and Arts at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine. Her research and scholarship focus on the patient-doctor relationship, attitudes and skills of empathy and professionalism, and the uses of the arts and literature in medical education.

Bryan S. Vartabedian, MD, is a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children’s Hospital/Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He blogs at 33charts.com.

Angeline L. Wang is a third-year medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor and a member of the American Medical Association Medical Student Section (AMA-MSS) Committee on Bioethics and Humanities.