Virtual Mentor

Virtual Mentor. February 2012, Volume 14, Number 2: 178-180.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethical Issues in Family Planning

Theme Issue Editor

Jennifer Braverman is a fourth-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. She obtained a bachelorís degree cum laude in sociology from Rice University, where she conducted research on childrenís access to preventive health care. While in medical school, Jennifer conducted research on cognitive biases in medical decision making. She plans to pursue a career in obstetrics and gynecology.

Contributors

Lusine Aghajanova, MD, PhD, is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. She obtained her doctoral degree from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. Because her particular interests are human reproduction and infertility, she has focused her research on human implantation and biomarkers of uterine receptivity, as well as on endometrial dysfunction in women with unexplained infertility and endometriosis.

Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD, is a bioethicist with a special interest in reproductive ethics. She is an assistant professor at the Alden March Bioethics Institute of Albany Medical College in New York and the co-editor of a book on the emerging field of oncofertility. She has been published in several medicine, science, and bioethics journals, including the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Science, The Hastings Center Report, and The American Journal of Bioethics. She earned her PhD in philosophy from Michigan State University and completed a postdoc with the Oncofertility Consortium at Northwestern University.

Frank A. Chervenak, MD, is the Given Foundation Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science. He has collaborated with Laurence B. McCullough on scholarly work and teaching ethics in obstetrics and gynecology since 1983. They have more than 160 publications in the peer-reviewed literature, and they co-authored Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology (Oxford University Press, 1994).

B. Jessie Hill, JD, is a professor of law at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. She received her law degree from Harvard Law School. Her research focuses on constitutional law, with a particular emphasis on reproductive and religious rights. Previously, Ms. Hill worked for the Reproductive Freedom Project of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

Laurence B. McCullough, PhD, holds the Dalton Tomlin Chair in Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He has collaborated with Frank A. Chervenak on scholarly work and teaching ethics in obstetrics and gynecology since 1983. They have more than 160 publications in the peer-reviewed literature, and they co-authored Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology (Oxford University Press, 1994).

Timothy F. Murphy, PhD, is a professor of philosophy in the biomedical sciences at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago.

Susan P. Raine, JD, MD, LLM, is an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, residency program director, and vice chairman for education at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Dr. Raineís clinical practice focuses on obstetrics and gynecology. Her research interests include family planning, simulation, and medical education.

Mara Y. Roth, MD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Rothís research focuses on the development of a male hormonal contraceptive, looking specifically at intratesticular hormone requirements necessary for spermatogenesis as a means of identifying nonresponders to contraceptive regimens.

Xiomara M. Santos, MD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. She is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and fellowship trained in pediatric and adolescent gynecology. Her research interests include adnexal masses in children and adolescents, pelvic inflammatory disease, menstrual disorders in adolescents, and congenital anomalies.

Britt Severson, MPH, is a fourth-year medical student at Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland. She received her MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests include contraceptive counseling, tobacco cessation in pregnancy, and abortion training in medical school.

Adam Sonfield, MPP, is a senior public policy associate at the Guttmacher Institute and a managing editor and regular contributor to its journal, the Guttmacher Policy Review. He also writes a quarterly Washington Watch column for Contraceptive Technology Update. His portfolio includes research and policy analysis on public and private financing of reproductive health care in the United States, the rights and responsibilities of health care providers and patients, and menís sexual and reproductive health.

Rebecca C. Thilo is a fourth-year medical student in the Medical Ethics Track at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. She is pursuing a residency in emergency medicine and is interested in medical humanities, womenís health, and spirituality and healing.

Kristina Tocce, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center in Aurora. She is the student program director and the assistant family planning fellowship director. Her research interests include adolescent contraception, abortion techniques, and medical student family planning curricula.

Cecilia T. Valdes, MD, is an associate clinical professor with an appointment in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and associate director of the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (REI) Fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Dr. Valdes is certified in REI, and her clinical and research interests include assisted reproduction, polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance, and metabolism.