AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. October 2012, Volume 14, Number 10: 818-820.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Pediatric Critical Care and Emergency Medicine

Theme Issue Editor

Jay R. Malone, MD, MS, is the pediatric chief resident at The Children’s Hospital of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. He serves on the ethics committee for The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and is a facilitator for the clinical ethics course at The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He received his MD, certificate in public health, and BS with distinction in zoology and biomedical sciences from The University of Oklahoma. He received his MS in health care ethics from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He plans to pursue fellowship training in pediatric critical care medicine.

Contributors

Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, MD, PhD, is the Lee Ault Carter Chair in Pediatric Ethics and the director of the Child Health Ethics Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio. His research interests build on his work as an ethics committee chair and clinical ethics consultant. His work on disaster triage developed out of his participation in planning for the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.

Jalayne J. Arias, JD, MA, is a fellow in the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics in Cleveland, Ohio. Ms. Arias’s research includes conceptual analysis of competency and decision-making processes.

John D.E. Barks, MD, is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, director of the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, director of neonatology research, co-director of the Brain Research and Innovative Neurological Care for Newborns (B.R.A.I.N. Care) program, and a member of the Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment Center at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Dr. Barks’s main research interests are in neonatal neurology, including hypothermia treatment of neonatal brain injury, bedside EEG monitoring, neonatal seizures, and imaging of the neonatal brain.

Valarie Blake, JD, MA, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Ms. Blake completed the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics, received her law degree with a certificate in health law and concentrations in bioethics and global health from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and obtained a master’s degree in bioethics from Case Western Reserve University. Her research focuses on ethical and legal issues in assisted reproductive technology and reproductive tissue transplants, as well as regulatory issues in research ethics.

Jeffrey P. Burns, MD, MPH, is chief of critical care medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and an associate professor of anesthesia (pediatrics) at Harvard Medical School. He is the program director for the Fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at both institutions. Dr. Burns is also director of OPENPediatrics, a web-based educational platform for doctors and nurses worldwide; the executive director of the Children’s Hospital Simulator Program, one of the first hospital-based pediatric simulator programs in the United States; and co-chair of the Boston Children’s Hospital ethics committee.

Edwin N. Forman, MD, is a professor in pediatric hematology/oncology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. His research interests include pediatric hematology/oncology and medical ethics.

Brent D. Kaziny, MD, is an assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. His research interests include disaster preparedness, relief, and recovery, with particular focus on special needs patients and children with chronic illness in the setting of disaster preparedness. While completing his internship at Tulane University in New Orleans, Dr. Kaziny received the Hurricane Katrina Code Grey Hero Award for his work during and after Hurricane Katrina.

Scott Y.H. Kim, MD, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and co-director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He has written extensively on the ethics of research involving the decisionally impaired, surrogate consent for incapacitated patients, the ethics of gene transfer research for neurodegenerative disorders, including the ethics of sham surgery trials, and ethical design of research protocols in neuropsychiatry. His book Evaluation of Capacity to Consent to Treatment and Research was published by Oxford University Press in 2010.

Tracy Koogler, MD, is an associate professor of pediatrics, assistant director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Ethics, co-director of the ethics case consultation service, vice chairman of the institutional review board, and medical director of the pediatric intensive care unit, all at the University of Chicago. She also works in the burn unit. Her research and educational interests are in research ethics, doctor-parent conflicts, pediatric palliative care, and organ donation.

Rosalind E. Ladd, PhD, is a visiting scholar in philosophy at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and a professor emerita at Wheaton College. Her research interests include pediatric ethics, decision making, and end-of-life issues.

Naomi T. Laventhal, MD, MA, is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases in the Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, an investigator in the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, and a member of the Pediatric Ethics Committee at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She provides clinical care to critically ill neonates at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and prenatal counseling to women with pregnancies complicated by congenital anomalies and expected preterm birth at Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital. Her research interests are in neonatal bioethics and clinical research ethics.

Margaret Moon, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a core faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics in Baltimore, Maryland, where she is the Freeman Family Scholar in Clinical Ethics.

Wynne Morrison, MD, MBE, is a pediatric critical care and pediatric palliative care physician at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania. She is also a senior fellow at the Center for Bioethics and an assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches in the medical school professionalism and ethics curriculum. Her scholarly work is in the areas of pediatric ethics, end-of-life care, patient-family-physician communication, and the medical humanities.

Philip J. Rettig, MD, is a professor of pediatrics and chief of the Section of Adolescent Medicine at the Oklahoma University (OU) College of Medicine in Oklahoma City, where he directs the clinical ethics course for second-year medical students. For more than 25 years, he has chaired and co-chaired ethics committees, first at The Children’s Hospital and then at the OU Medical Center.

Kathryn L. Weise, MD, MA, is a staff physician in the Pediatric Institute at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, where she conducts adult and pediatric ethics consultation and directs the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics. She is a pediatric intensivist who cares for patients at the Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital for Rehabilitation, including children who are the victims of nonaccidental trauma. Her research interests include pediatric ethics and professional ethics.

Traci A. Wolbrink, MD, MPH, is an assistant in critical care medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital and an instructor in anesthesia at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Wolbrink is the associate director of OPENPediatrics, a web-based educational platform for doctors and nurses worldwide. Her research focuses on innovative educational strategies in pediatric critical care medicine.