Virtual Mentor

Virtual Mentor. December 2012, Volume 14, Number 12: 1036-1039.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics in Medical School and Residency Program Admission

Theme Issue Editor

Stephanie K. Fabbro, MD, is a first-year resident at The Ohio State University in Columbus, completing a medicine internship before entering her chosen specialty, dermatology. She recently graduated from Northeast Ohio Medical University with her medical degree as well as her certificate in bioethics and won the North American Primary Care Research Group Award for her contribution to research in medical education. Her research and career interests include ethical innovation in medical education, complex medical dermatology, and psychocutaneous disorders.

Contributors

Julie M. Aultman, PhD, philosopher and bioethicist by training, is an associate professor of family and community medicine, director of the Bioethics Certificate Program for health care professionals and students, and chair of the institutional review board at Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown. She also directs and coordinates the bioethics curriculum at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, which is expected to evolve into a master’s degree program in the next few years.

Rick D. Axelson, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and a program evaluation consultant for the office of consultation and research in medical education at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. Dr. Axelson has developed and directed academic program assessment and institutional research offices at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, the University of South Alabama, and Riverside Community College. His research interests include program evaluation (theory, methods, and practice), learning outcomes assessment, and the development of practical methods for assessing the social, cognitive, and psychological factors affecting students’ engagement in learning activities and environments.

Valarie Blake, JD, MA, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Ms. Blake completed the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics, received her law degree with a certificate in health law and concentrations in bioethics and global health from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and obtained a master’s degree in bioethics from Case Western Reserve University. Her research focuses on ethical and legal issues in assisted reproductive technology and reproductive tissue transplants, as well as regulatory issues in research ethics.

Carol L. Elam, EdD, is associate dean for admissions and institutional advancement, a professor of behavioral science, and director of medical education research at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine in Lexington. She has served as the admissions dean at UKCOM for 22 years. Her published work focuses on medical school admissions selection criteria, medical school admissions interviewing, diversity and pipeline initiatives, approaches to service learning, and the characteristics of millennial students.

Kristi J. Ferguson, MSW, PhD, is a professor of general internal medicine, director of the office of consultation and research in medical education, and director of the master’s in medical education program at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. Her research interests include assessing the validity of measures of student performance, assessing the predictive value of a small group experience during the admissions process, and evaluating students’ ability to recognize team behaviors in a simulation environment.

Katherine Gordon, MD, will begin her residency in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas in July 2013. She is from Winter Park, Florida, and graduated from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Marianne M. Green, MD, is the associate dean for medical education and competency achievement and an associate professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She is also a practicing internist.

Matthew Janko is a third-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, where he is a member of the Clinical/Translational Research Pathway program and the student government.

Elizabeth Joe is a fourth-year student at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston.

Justin M. List, MD, MAR, is a third-year resident in the Yale School of Medicine primary care program in New Haven, Connecticut. He will start a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program fellowship at the University of Michigan in 2013. He was a fellow in the American Medical Association Institute for Ethics and received his master’s degree in ethics at Yale Divinity School. His interests include global health systems strengthening, health and human rights, and medical professionalism.

Andreia Martins Martinho is a graduate student at New York University and a 2012 summer intern in the ethics group of the American Medical Association in Chicago. She studied law at University of Coimbra in Portugal and came to the United States on a Fulbright scholarship to study bioethics.

Kevin McMullen is a third-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester. He is interested in improving the quality of medical education and in developing mobile health solutions for patients and providers.

Eliza C. Miller, MD graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in May 2012 and is a first-year resident in neurology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

Erik Porfeli, MD, is the assistant dean for community engagement and admissions at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) in Rootstown. His research centers on social and developmental psychology with an emphasis on career development and vocational behavior from childhood through the young adulth years. He applies this research at NEOMED through recruitment and matriculation efforts aimed at creating a diverse medical school student body that values primary care and service to the medically underserved.

Mariya Rozenblit is a third-year student at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

Sandra M. Sanguino, MD, MPH, is the associate dean for student programs and career development and an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She is a general pediatrician.

Jennifer Saultz, DO, is a second-year resident in The Ohio State University Department of Internal Medicine residency program in Columbus. Her research interests include medical education and hematology/oncology.

Jennifer A. Sbicca, MD, attended the University of Florida College of Medicine. She will be doing her dermatology residency at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include ethical challenges in dermatology.

Samuel Shem (Stephen J. Bergman), MD, PhD, is a doctor, novelist, playwright, and activist. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard, a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University’s Balliol College, and a graduate of Harvard Medical School, he was on the faculty of Harvard for three decades. He is the award-winning author of House of God, Mount Misery, Fine, The Spirit of the Place (Berkley/Penguin, available in paperback in December 2012), and, with his wife, Janet Surrey, the play Bill W. and Dr. Bob and the book We Have to Talk: Healing Dialogues Between Women and Men.

Bilal A. Siddiqui is a second-year student at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

William Smith is a third-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and a second-year PhD candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame.

Stefani Takahashi, MD, is associate professor and residency program director for the Department of Dermatology at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Her areas of interest are pediatric dermatology and graduate medical education.

John X. Thomas, Jr., PhD, is a professor of physiology and medical education and senior associate dean for medical education at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. As senior associate dean, he is responsible for the undergraduate medical education program, student programs, registration and records, and continuing medical education.

Asher Tulsky, MD, is an associate professor of medicine and associate program director at the University of Pittsburgh Internal Medicine Residency program in Pennsylvania. He has been actively involved in residency education for more than 15 years, with a focus on evaluation, advising, and intern recruitment.

Norma E. Wagoner, PhD, holds a part-time faculty position at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, where she teaches anatomy to medical and dental students. Previously, she was Colorado’s associate dean of admissions, associate dean for student affairs and admissions at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, admissions dean at Rush Medical College, and dean of students and professor of anatomy at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

Kelley Wittbold a former biotech and pharmaceutical business consultant, is a third-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester. She is a member of the Clinical/Translational Research Pathway program within the neurosurgery department and a mentor to pediatric hematology/oncology patients and their families.

Nathan Wright, MD, is a second-year resident in The Ohio State University Department of Internal Medicine residency program in Columbus. His research interests include medical education, quality improvement, and critical care.

Matthew J. Zirwas, MD, is an associate professor of dermatology at The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus. He is the residency program director in dermatology and has worked on several curriculum redesign and admissions committees. His primary nonclinical research interest is resident and medical student selection, specifically the identification of effective predictors of performance during medical school and residency.