AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. December 2013, Volume 15, Number 12: 1110-1112.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Medicine’s Role in the “Good Death”

Theme Issue Editor

Sophia Cedola is a second-year medical student at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. She earned her BS in psychology, graduating summa cum laude with thesis honors, from Tufts University in 2010 and completed the Bryn Mawr College Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program in 2011. She has worked for the Columbia University Medical Center Cardiothoracic Surgery Lab and the multi-institutional Lung Transplant Outcomes Group. Her interests include medical education, quality improvement, organ donation and transplantation, palliative care, and end-of-life issues.

Contributors

Darryl C. Abrams, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

Preetha Basaviah, MD, is assistant dean of preclerkship education, course director for the Practice of Medicine 2-year doctoring course, associate professor of medicine, and educator for CARE at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Basaviah has scholarly interests in clinical skills curricula, innovations in medical education related to themes in doctoring courses, and faculty development.

Rachelle E. Bernacki, MD, MS, is the director of quality initiatives in the Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and jointly appointed in the Division of Aging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is the principal investigator of the Serious Illness Communication Checklist at Harvard School of Public Health’s Ariadne Labs in Boston.

Craig D. Blinderman, MD, is director of the adult palliative medicine service and co-director of the Center for Supportive Care and Clinical Ethics in the Department of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

Susan D. Block, MD, is the chair of the Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, co-director of the Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, a professor of psychiatry and medicine at Harvard Medical School, and director of the End of Life Program at Harvard School of Public Health’s Ariadne Labs in Boston. Her research interests include: health system innovation to improve care of patients with serious illness, end-of-life communication, bereavement, and palliative care education.

Daniel Brodie, MD, is an associate professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

Kristin M. Burkart, MD, MSc, is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

May Hua, MD, is an assistant professor of anesthesiology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Her medical degree is from the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. Her research focuses on end-of-life care in the intensive care unit and is supported by a mentored training research grant from the Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research.

Thomas W. Laqueur, PhD, is the Helen Fawcett Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his BA in philosophy from Swarthmore College in 1967 and his PhD in history from Princeton University in 1973. He regularly co-teaches a course on death and dying in historical and contemporary. He is finishing a book called The Work of the Dead that will be published by Princeton University Press in 2014.

Rabbi Dov Linzer is the academic head and dean of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School in Riverdale, New York.

Vyjeyanthi S. Periyakoil, MD, is a clinical associate professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, the director of the Stanford palliative care education and training program, and the founder and director of Stanford eCampus. A nationally recognized leader in geriatrics and palliative care, Dr. Periyakoil serves as the associate director of palliative care services for the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Her research focuses on the health and health care of adult patients with chronic and serious illnesses, multicultural health, geriatrics, ethnogeriatrics, and ethnopalliative care. Dr. Periyakoil can be contacted at periyakoil@stanford.edu.

Beth Popp, MD, is director of the Division of Palliative Medicine and associate program director of the Department of Hematology Oncology at Maimonides Medical Center and on the faculty of SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York.

Kenneth Prager, MD, is a professor of medicine, director of medical ethics, and chair of the medical ethics committee at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

Christina Staudt, PhD, is the chair of the Columbia University Seminar on Death and the president of the Westchester End-of-Life Coalition. She has been a hospice volunteer for 15 years, with a primary focus on attending to the actively dying and their families.

Audrey Tan, DO, is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. Tan completed her emergency medicine residency at Kings County Hospital Center/SUNY Downstate Medical Center and a fellowship in hospice and palliative medicine at New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

Richard Weinmeyer, JD, MPhil, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs. Mr. Weinmeyer received his law degree from the University of Minnesota, where he completed a concentration in health law and bioethics and served as editor in chief for volume 31 of the law journal Law and Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice. He obtained his master’s degree in sociology from Cambridge University and is completing a second master’s in bioethics from the University of Minnesota Center for Bioethics. Previously, Mr. Weinmeyer served as a project coordinator at the University of Minnesota Division of Epidemiology and Community Health. His research interests are in public health law, bioethics, and biomedical research regulation.