AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. December 2014, Volume 16, Number 12: 1032-1035.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: Telemedicine's Challenges for the Medical Profession

Theme Issue Editor

Vinod E. Nambudiri, MD, MBA, is a resident in internal medicine and dermatology in the Harvard Combined Medicine-Dermatology Residency Training Program in Boston. His interests include complex medical dermatology, medical leadership, and the integration of technology into medicine.

Contributors

Eseosa Asemota, MD, MPH, obtained her master’s degree in public health from Harvard University, completed her first-year residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and received her MD from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria. She has worked at the New York University Langone Medical Center as a program manager coordinating public health research and currently holds a clinical observership at the University of Pennsylvania, where she is researching telemedicine and the optimal use of resources for medical dermatologic diseases in the developing world.

Mark Carroll, MD, is the chief medical officer at Flagstaff Medical Center, Northern Arizona Healthcare, in Flagstaff. He previously served as the national telemedicine director for the Indian Health Service and is a former board member of the American Telemedicine Association.

Tina Choudhri, MD, is the associate program director for the Emergency Medicine Residency Program and an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC.

Michael A. DeVita, MD, is director of critical care at Harlem Hospital Center in New York. He has been an international leader in transplantation and critical care ethics, simulation education, and rapid response systems. The Society of Critical Care Medicine has awarded him the Grenvik Family award for contributions to critical care ethics and the Asmund S. Laerdal award for contributions to resuscitation research.

Stewart Ferguson, PhD, is the chief information officer for the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in Anchorage. He is the former director of the Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network and a past president of the American Telemedicine Association.

Christopher Fore, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and the director of the Indian Health Service Tele-Behavioral Health Center of Excellence based in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Nicholas Freudenberg, MD, is in his fourth year of psychiatry residency training in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, Davis. He attended medical school at University of Southern California, where he became interested in the effects that psychological processes can have on disease states and quality of life. His current areas of interest include psychodynamic psychotherapy and telepsychiatry.

Richard Gunderman, MD, PhD, is Chancellor’s Professor in the schools of medicine, liberal arts, and philanthropy at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, where he practices pediatric radiology.

Mario Gutierrez, MPH, is executive director of the Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) in Sacramento, California. Before joining CCHP in 2010, Mr. Gutierrez was a senior program director and lead person for Rural and Agricultural Worker Health Programs and Policy for The California Endowment, where he led the foundation’s $20 million investment in telehealth deployment throughout the state. Mr. Gutierrez serves on the board of directors of the California State Rural Health Association and OCHIN, a nonprofit health information network, and is considered one of the nation’s foremost authorities on telehealth policy.

Timothy M. Hale, PhD, is a research fellow at the Center for Connected Health and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He received his doctorate in medical sociology from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, in 2011. His work has been published in the Journals of Gerontology, Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, American Behavioral Scientist, and Information, Communication and Society. His current research examines how new information and communication technologies are transforming existing models of health care and emerging digital health lifestyles.

Allison Harriott, MD, MPH, is completing a fellowship in critical care medicine at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. She trained in emergency medicine in the State University of New York Downstate/Kings County Hospital residency program in Brooklyn. Her academic interests focus on medical education, simulation, and critical care in the emergency department.

Howard Hays, MD, MSPH, retired from public service in 2014 and is now a health care informatics consultant in private practice in Phoenix, Arizona. Dr. Hays is the former acting director and chief information officer for the Indian Health Service Office of Information Technology.

Mark Horton, OD, MD, is a practicing ophthalmologist at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona, and director of the Indian Health Service Joslin Vision Network Teleophthalmology Program.

Robert Jarrin, JD, is senior director of government affairs for Qualcomm Incorporated, responsible for Qualcomm’s efforts directed toward federal and state health information technology policy, oversight of convergent medical devices, congressional legislative health affairs, Medicare and Medicaid telehealth reimbursement, and improvement of broadband access for health care. Mr. Jarrin is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC.

Carrie L. Kovarik, MD, is an associate professor of dermatology, dermatopathology, and infectious diseases and director of the Penn Dermatology Global Health Program at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Kovarik is also the head of dermatology, informatics, and telemedicine for the Botswana-UPenn Partnership and the primary dermatology consultant for the Baylor International Pediatrics AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) in Africa, in which capacity she worked collaboratively with several other institutions and 12 African countries to create an African teledermatology consult service. As chair of the Residents’ International Grant Work Group within the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), Dr. Kovarik received funding to send more than 80 senior dermatology residents to participate in 4 to 6 week rotations on the dermatology consult service in Botswana during 2008-2014.

Joseph C. Kvedar, MD, is the founder and director of the Center for Connected Health and associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School in Boston. A frequent lecturer, Dr. Kvedar has authored more than 70 publications on connected health and the application of communications technologies to improve health care. He serves on the board of the Continua Health Alliance and the Population Health Alliance, was a president and board member of the American Telemedicine Association, and was a chair of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Telemedicine Task Force. In 2009, Dr. Kvedar was honored with the ATA’s Individual Leadership Award for his significant contributions to connected health and telemedicine.

Mei Wa Kwong, JD, is a senior policy associate at the Center for Connected Health Policy (CCHP) and project director for CCHP’s National Telehealth Policy Resource Center in Sacramento, California. Ms. Kwong has written numerous policy briefs, crafted state legislation, and led several coalition efforts on a variety of telemedicine and telehealth issues. She also has published articles on telehealth and telehealth policy in various peer-reviewed journals.

James P. Marcin, MD, MPH, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine and practices in the pediatric intensive care unit at UC Davis Children’s Hospital. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Marcin conducts research on the impact of telemedicine on patient satisfaction, patient safety, and quality and cost of care, particularly as they relate to the care of acutely ill and injured children.

Shivan J. Mehta, MD, MBA, is an assistant professor of medicine in gastroenterology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. He is also director of operations at the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation and has interests in behavioral economics and connected health.

Karen Rheuban, MD, is a professor of pediatrics, senior associate dean for CME and external affairs, and director of the Center for Telehealth at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville.

Christine Shanahan is a medical student at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville.

Neal Sikka, MD, is the director for the Emergency Medicine Telemedicine and Digital Health Fellowship program, chief of the Innovative Practice and Telehealth Section, and an associate professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC. Dr. Sikka has expertise in health information technology, including informatics, telemedicine, mobile health, technology adoption, and patient engagement.

Katherine Willson is a medical student at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville.

Peter M. Yellowlees, MBBS, MD, is vice chair for faculty development and professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, where he also is chair of the Medical Staff Well-Being Committee. He has worked in the public and private sectors in the USA, Australia, and the UK and has published five books and more than 200 scientific articles and book chapters. Dr. Yellowlees is working on physician health and wellness, e-mail and videoconsultation services, and the development and validation of asynchronous telepsychiatry.