AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. November 2015, Volume 17, Number 11: 1098-1101.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: High-Value Care

Theme Issue Editor

Sri Lekha Tummalapalli, MD, MBA, is a second year internal medicine resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. She graduated from Harvard University with a joint MD/MBA degree. She is interested in quality improvement, medical education, and hospital administration.

Contributors

Vineet Arora, MD, MAPP, is an associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago. As director of GME (graduate medical education) clinical learning environment innovation, she works to integrate residents into the quality, safety, and value missions of the organization. She is also director of educational initiatives at Costs of Care and co-author of the book, Understanding Value-Based Healthcare (McGraw-Hill, 2015).

Aditya Ashok is a second-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston. A Harry S. Truman and Marshall Scholar, Aditya has interests in value-based medicine and medical education.

Annika Beck is majoring in philosophy at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, where she has co-authored two publications at the intersection of philosophy and popular culture. Her research in the summer of 2015 was made possible by the Summer Undergraduate Program in Bioethics Research at the Mayo Clinic. Her current bioethics research interests include medical futility, HIV cure research studies, and pediatric end-of-life issues.

Maggie K. Benson, MD, MS, is an assistant professor and clinician-educator in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. She is fellowship-trained in medical education and women’s health, having earned her master’s degree in medical education in 2015. For her thesis on high-value care education, Dr. Benson was given the Mack Lipkin Sr. Award by the Society of General Internal Medicine.

Hyung J. Cho, MD, is an academic hospitalist and assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Hospital Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, where he also is the director of quality and patient safety and the chair of the High Value Care Committee, in which capacity he developed the OCCAM’s (overuse clinical case morbidity and mortality) Conference and the approach of looking at overuse as a medical error. His research is in overuse and its link to patient harm.

Jeffrey Clemens, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, San Diego, in La Jolla and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economics Research. He is currently on sabbatical as a visiting scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. His research interests are in the intersections between health economics and public finance, the economics of redistribution and social insurance, and state and local government finances.

Brandon Combs, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora and a senior fellow for medical education at the Lown Institute. A primary care physician and general internist, he is actively involved in medical student and resident education in both inpatient and ambulatory settings. Dr. Combs co-founded the Do No Harm Project in 2012 and is a section editor of the Teachable Moments section in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nanette Elster, JD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Her research interests are in public health, biotechnologies, children’s and women’s health, and genetics.

Robert L. Fogerty, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a practicing hospitalist at Yale-New Haven Hospital, where he is associate chief of the Generalist Firm and a member of the core faculty in the Internal Medicine Residency Program.

Reshma Gupta, MD, MSHPM is an internal medicine physician who is supported by the VA Office of Academic Affiliations through the VA/Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is also the director of the joint Costs of Care/American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation Teaching Value in Healthcare Learning Network.

Ran Huo, MD, is a clinical palliative care fellow at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. She hopes to improve access to palliative care for patients with hematologic malignancies.

Eva Luo, MD, MBA, is an obstetrics and gynecology resident at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She is interested in innovations in value-based care delivery, primarily models that arise from the entrepreneurship space, and their impact on overall policy. Her primary areas of focus are prenatal care, labor and delivery operations, and prenatal diagnostics.

Diane E. Meier, MD, is a professor of geriatrics and palliative medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and the director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC).

Christopher Moriates, MD, is an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Hospital Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Moriates is the director of the Caring Wisely initiative for the UCSF Center for Healthcare Value and is the director of implementation initiatives at Costs of Care. He co-authored the book, Understanding Value-Based Healthcare (McGraw-Hill, 2015).

Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD, is a professor and the director of graduate studies in the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. His research interests are in clinical ethics, ethics education, global health, and professionalism and professional ethics.

Neel Shah, MD, MPP, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a member of the associate faculty at the Ariadne Labs for Health Systems Innovation. He is also the founder and executive director of Costs of Care. He co-authored the book, Understanding Value-Based Healthcare (McGraw-Hill, 2015).

Bjorg Thorsteinsdottir, MD, is a primary care physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. She graduated from the University of Iceland Faculty of Medicine, completed her residency in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic, and is board certified in internal medicine and palliative care. She completed a fellowship in medical ethics at Harvard Medical School under the tutelage of Dr. Mildred Z. Solomon. Her research interests center on the ethics and economics of end-of-life care, with a special focus on the frail elderly.

Jon C. Tilburt, MD, MPH, practices general internal medicine and integrative medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where he is a professor of medicine and an associate professor of biomedical ethics. He obtained his MD from Vanderbilt University and completed ethics and general internal medicine research fellowships at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Tilburt has served in ethics service roles for the American College of Physicians, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Society of General Internal Medicine, and at the Mayo Clinic. He has received numerous research awards from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, and private foundations to investigate challenges and opportunities of improving patient-centered care, including evidence-based medicine, shared decision making, health care reform, integrative medicine, and health disparities, with a strong emphasis on cancer care delivery.

Cynthia Tsay, MPhil, is a second-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. She is interested in bioethics and in how the complex social forces that historically have shaped the development of new trends and beliefs in medicine can inform future global health policy and reform.

Stan Veuger, PhD, is a resident scholar in economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research in Washington, DC, and the editor of AEI Economic Perspectives. His research areas are public finance and political economy, and he also writes frequently for general audiences on topics including health care policy, fiscal policy, politics, and popular culture.

Josué A. Zapata, MD, is chief resident in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Zapata leads quality improvement and patient safety education for the internal medicine residency program, focusing on improving the delivery of health care at UCSF Moffitt-Long Hospital, San Francisco General Hospital, and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Ali John Zarrabi, MD, is a clinical fellow in palliative medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. He hopes to build a career in palliative oncology.