AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. February 2016, Volume 18, Number 2: 192-194.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Liver Transplant Ethics: From Donation to Allocation

Theme Issue Editor

Natasha H. Dolgin is a sixth-year MD/PhD candidate at the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine in Worcester, where she will soon defend her doctoral work on liver transplantation policy and outcomes research undertaken in the Clinical and Population Health Research Program and the Department of Surgery. She is on the Ethics, Grievances, and Professional Standards Committee of the Massachusetts Medical Society and previously worked as a research assistant in the Department of Bioethics at the Cleveland Clinic.

Contributors

Joel T. Adler, MD, MPH, is a fourth-year resident in general surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He plans to complete a fellowship in transplant surgery.

Aaron Ahearn, MD, PhD, is a transplant surgeon and an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester. His clinical practice includes liver, kidney, and pancreas transplant as well as hepatobilliary surgery. His interests include basic science models of liver allograft tolerance, clinical investigations into the role of machine perfusion in liver allograft preservation, and transplant ethics and organ allocation.

David A. Axelrod, MD, MBA, is the section chief of solid organ transplant surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and an associate professor of surgery at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. He is a regional councilor for the United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) and a member of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/UNOS Membership and Professional Standards Committee.

Katrina A. Bramstedt, PhD, MA, is a professor and clinical ethicist at Bond University School of Medicine in Queensland, Australia, specializing in organ donation and transplant ethics, including issues involving composite tissue allotransplantation. She is a member of the Transplantation Society’s ethics committee and has published extensively in her field, including, with Rena Brown, The Organ Donor Experience: Good Samaritans and the Meaning of Altruism (Rowman and Littlefield, 2011) and Finding Your Way: A Medical Ethics Handbook for Patients and Families (Hilton Publishing, 2012).

Bette-Jane Crigger, PhD, is the director of ethics policy and the secretary of the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs at the American Medical Association in Chicago. Previously, she was chief of ethics communications for the Veterans Health Administration, senior editor of the Hastings Center Report, and managing editor of IRB: A Review of Human Subjects Research.

Geraldine C. Diaz, DO, is a clinical associate of anesthesia at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Elisa J. Gordon, PhD, MPH, is an associate professor in the Division of Organ Transplantation and in the Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She also serves as the vice chair of the UNOS Ethics Committee and on the editorial board of the American Journal of Transplantation. Trained as a medical anthropologist and clinical ethicist, Dr. Gordon conducts mixed-methods research on informed consent, health disparities, and ethical issues pertaining to chronic kidney disease and living donation and transplantation.

Jean-Baptiste Hoang is a third-year medical student at Bond University School of Medicine in Queensland, Australia. His primary interest is surgery, specifically transplantation, reconstructive, and ophthalmic surgery.

Gowri Kabbur is a third-year medical student at Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, Ohio.

Keren Ladin, PhD, MSc, is an assistant professor in the departments of occupational therapy, community health, and public health and community medicine at Tufts University in Boston, where she is also the director of Research on Ethics, Aging, and Community Health. Her research interests include resource allocation for vulnerable populations, moral judgment, and decision making in medicine with a view to understanding how social networks impact health disparities, acute medical decision making, and resilience in major life transitions.

Josh Levitsky, MD, is an associate professor of medicine and surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, where he is also the program director for the gastroenterology and hepatology fellowships. A transplant hepatologist, Dr. Levitsky serves as a board member of the International Liver Transplantation Society and the American Society of Transplantation. His research focuses on liver transplant outcomes.

Alon B. Neidich, MD, is a resident in general surgery at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri. He obtained a bachelor’s degree with honors in law, letters, and society from the University of Chicago, where he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow investigating informed consent and women’s attitudes toward obstetric and pediatric biobanks. A graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine, his work has been published in the American Journal of Transplantation, Progress in Transplantation, the American Journal of Medical Genetics, the Journal of Medical Ethics, and The New Physician.

Eitan Neidich is a medical student at the University of California, San Francisco. He obtained a bachelor’s degree with honors in political theory, science, and law from Cornell University. His work has been published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Progress in Transplantation, and the American Journal of Transplantation.

John F. Renz, MD, PhD, is a professor of surgery at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine who specializes in liver transplantation. He is interested in marginal organs and extended donor criteria to expand the donor pool.

Ajay Singhvi, MD, is a third-year internal medicine resident at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Recently recognized by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases as an Emerging Liver Scholar, he has clinical interests in alcoholic liver disease and outcomes after liver transplantation. Dr. Singhvi received his MD from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and plans to pursue a career in gastroenterology and hepatology.

Deepti Singhvi, MD, is a third-year internal medicine resident at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, where she is a member of the Academy for Quality and Safety Improvement and a participant in the Women’s Health program. Dr. Singhvi received her MD from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and plans to pursue a career in critical care medicine.

Andy A. Tully, MD, is a first-year surgical resident at MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC.

Alexandra N. Welch is a second-year medical student at the Feinberg School of Medicine and is also pursuing a master’s degree in the Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program at Northwestern University in Chicago. Her research interests include transplant ethics.

Stuart J. Youngner, MD, is a professor of bioethics and psychiatry in the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and specializes in end-of-life issues, organ transplantation, and clinical ethics consultation.