AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. December 2016, Volume 18, Number 12: 1249-1252.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics in Neuropsychology

Theme Issue Editor

Jacquelyn Nestor is a fifth-year MD/PhD student at Hofstra-Northwell School of Medicine at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. Her thesis research will examine the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. She is also interested in the ethical questions raised by emerging technologies and end-of-life care.

Contributors

William Affleck is currently completing his PhD in social psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal and is also a postdoctoral researcher at the Neuroethics Research Unit of the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal. His research focuses on ethical issues of traumatic stress research and the topic of vulnerability in mental health research ethics.

B. Rashmi Borah is a research associate at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues in Washington, DC. She earned her BS in microbiology and philosophy from Ohio State University, where she was a Pelotonia Research Fellow and conducted research on informed consent for patients wishing to undergo prophylactic organ removal.

Mikaela Brandt-Fontaine is a second-year undergraduate studying neuroscience at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where she is also a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab. She plans to attend medical school and to continue researching the relationship between medicine and the legal system.

MaryKatherine Brueck is a fourth-year undergraduate at Loyola University Chicago, where she studies philosophy with a concentration in bioethics. During the summer and fall of 2016, she was an intern for the American Medical Association’s Ethics Group.

Kata L. Chillag, PhD, is the associate director of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues in Washington, DC. She completed her postdoctoral training in applied epidemiology and public health as an epidemic intelligence service officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and spent most of her prior career at the CDC in varied global and domestic public health programs and research, including polio eradication, microbicide and antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis HIV prevention trials, and as deputy chief for medically at-risk populations during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

Suparna Choudhury, PhD, is an assistant professor at McGill University’s Division of Social & Transcultural Psychiatry in Montreal. Her research investigates how biological knowledge with significant social and clinical impact is produced, how this knowledge circulates and how it is taken up, applied, or resisted as well as the social and political contexts of cognitive neuroscience and interdisciplinary approaches to brain research.

Blythe A. Corbett, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and an investigator with the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center and the Center for Cognitive Medicine. Dr. Corbett is also the director of the Kennedy Center’s Social Emotional Neuroscience Endocrinology (SENSE) Lab, a translational research program focused on reciprocal social functioning and stress responsivity of children with autism spectrum disorder.

Joseph J. Fins, MD, is the E. William Davis, Jr. M.D. Professor of Medical Ethics and chief of the Division of Medical Ethics at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, where he also serves as professor of medicine, professor of medical ethics in neurology, and professor of medicine in psychiatry. Dr. Fins is the Solomon Center Distinguished Scholar in Medicine, Bioethics and the Law at Yale Law School. His most recent book is Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Laura N. Gitlin, PhD, is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and School of Medicine in Baltimore, where she is also the director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging. Her clinical and research expertise is in caregiving and nonpharmacological approaches in dementia care.

Nancy A. Hodgson, PhD, RN, is an associate professor and the Anthony Buividas Endowed Term Chair in Gerontology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia. Her clinical and research expertise is focused on the area of dementia caregiving.

Judy Illes, PhD, is professor of neurology, Canada Research Chair in Neuroethics, and director of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Dr. Illes’s research focuses on ethical, legal, social, and policy challenges specifically at the intersection of the neurosciences and biomedical ethics, including in the areas of incidental findings and functional neuroimaging in basic and clinical research, addiction neuroethics, stem cells and regenerative medicine, dementia, neurodevelopmental disorders, and the commercialization of cognitive neuroscience.

Jordan Dean Scott Krieg is a fourth-year undergraduate studying neuroscience at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where he is also a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab. He plans to attend medical school.

Jaleh McTeigue is a third-year undergraduate at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. Previously, she was a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab, conducted protein crystallography research at Los Alamos National Laboratory and worked as a science and technology intern with the office of Congressman Ben Ray Lujn of New Mexico.

Sheehan Moore is a PhD student in anthropology at the City University of New York Graduate Center in New York City and an editorial assistant at HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory. He received his BA in anthropology from McGill University.

Caitlin Opperman is a second-year law student at the University of Minnesota Law School in the Twin Cities, where she is a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab. Prior to attending law school, she earned her undergraduate degree in psychology and worked as a clinical psychometrist. She is interested in exploring the intersection of law and neuropsychology as well as the connections between science and law more broadly.

Joshua Preston is in his first year of a joint JD/MA in bioethics at the University of Minnesota Law School in the Twin Cities, where he is also a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab. He is a research fellow at the Center for Science and Law at Baylor College of Medicine. His work focuses on the intersection of law, neuroscience, and public policy.

Eric Racine, PhD, is a full research professor and the director of the Neuroethics Research Unit at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal with cross-appointments at the Universit de Montréal and McGill University. He is the author of Pragmatic Neuroethics: Improving Treatment and Understanding of the Mind-Brain (MIT Press, 2010).

Julie M. Robillard, PhD, is an assistant professor of neurology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Her research program uses a trans-disciplinary approach to examine issues at the intersection of aging, technology, and ethics.

Francis X. Shen, JD, PhD, is an associate professor of law at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where he also serves as director of the Shen Neurolaw Lab. He is executive director of education and outreach for the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience and a faculty member at the Center for Law, Brain and Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Nicolle K. Strand, JD, MBioethics, is special assistant to the director at the Veterans Health Administration’s National Center for Ethics in Health Care in Washington, DC. She is a former senior policy and research analyst at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues in Washington, DC, where she was an early contributor to the report on neuroscience ethics and the report on deliberation and bioethics education and also served as the staff lead for the Commission’s ongoing project, reflecting on the role of bioethics advisory bodies in the United States and abroad. The work associated with this article was conducted while Ms. Strand was a staff member at the Presidential Commission for the study of Bioethical Issues.

Alina Yasis is a fourth-year undergraduate studying psychology with a minor in neuroscience at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where she is also a research assistant in the Shen Neurolaw Lab. She plans to pursue graduate studies in neuroscience.