AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. March 2018, Volume 20, Number 3: 303-306.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: Global Reproductive Health Care Ethics in the 21st Century

Theme Issue Editor

Ashish Premkumar, MD, is a first-year fellow in maternal-fetal medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, where he is also a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology. His research interests include perinatal illicit substance use, the role of maternal race/ethnicity in adverse health outcomes, and global health inequalities in reproductive health.

Contributors

Julianna G. Alson, MPH, is the research coordinator in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her research and community-engaged practice focus on addressing the social determinants of inequity and racism in particular in reproductive and sexual health outcomes, education, and quality of care.

Kavita Shah Arora, MD, MBE, is an assistant professor of reproductive biology and bioethics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. She is also the director of quality in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at MetroHealth Medical Center. She has served on the national ethics committees of both the American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Meg Autry, MD, is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, where she is also the residency director and director of graduate medical education. She is an army veteran and the past president of the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics. She serves on the editorial board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists presidential task force for global health, and her grant funding focuses on workforce development and interprofessional education.

Amy G. Bryant, MD, MSCR, is an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Family Planning Division at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Her research interests include abortion access, crisis pregnancy centers, and postpartum long-acting reversible contraception.

Nancy D. Campbell, PhD, is a professor of science and technology studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. A historian of science and medicine, she researches the multiple ways in which women—pregnant, potentially pregnant, or not pregnant—have been used and abused in drug policy and how women’s rights to medical decision making are constrained by interlocking medical and carceral systems designed to respond to illicit drug use. Her books include Using Women: Gender, Drug Policy, and Social Justice (Routledge, 2000); Discovering Addiction: The Science and Politics of Substance Abuse Research (University of Michigan Press, 2007); with JP Olsen and Luke Walden, The Narcotic Farm: The Rise and Fall of the First US Prison for Drug Addicts (Abrams, 2008); and with Elizabeth Ettorre, Gendering Addiction: The Politics of Drug Treatment in a Neurochemical World (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).

Kemi M. Doll, MD, MS, is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is a practicing gynecologic oncologist and health services researcher focused on investigating the intersection of race, gender, and quality of care in gynecologic cancers.

Margaret Mary Downey, MSW, is a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Welfare at the University of California, Berkeley, where she also completed her master of social work degree. Prior to attending graduate school, she practiced as a birth and abortion doula in Philadelphia at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania, respectively. During this time she also served as a research specialist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine on several National Institutes of Health-funded projects in partnership with the Philadelphia Departments of Education and Public Welfare, supporting teachers and community-based clinicians in implementing evidence-based mental health services. Her current research interests are reproductive health and justice and the political economy of health.

Kacey Y. Eichelberger, MD, is an assistant professor and the vice chair of academics at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville/Greenville Health System. She is a practicing maternal-fetal medicine physician with a particular interest in health equity in perinatal medicine.

Anu Manchikanti Gómez, MSc, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Social Welfare and the director of the Sexual Health and Reproductive Equity (SHARE) Program. For more than 15 years, Dr. Gómez has worked as a health equity researcher; she has conducted research both in the US and globally on diverse topics, including contraceptive use, abortion, HIV prevention, gender equity, transgender health, and violence against women and children. Dr. Gómez’s current research focuses on three areas: the measurement and meaning of pregnancy planning; understanding contraceptive decision making within social, relational, and structural contexts; and evaluating the impact of and evidence base for policies related to reproductive health.

Marcia C. Inhorn, PhD, MPH, is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. A medical anthropologist focusing on infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in the Middle East, Inhorn is the author of six books on this subject, including The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East (Princeton University Press, 2012), Cosmopolitan Conceptions: IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai (Duke University Press, 2015), and America’s Arab Refugees: Vulnerability and Health on the Margins (Stanford University Press, 2018). She is also the editor of ten volumes and the author of nearly 150 articles and book chapters on gender, health, and assisted reproduction.

Christina Krudy, MD, is a third-year obstetrics and gynecology resident in the Case Western MetroHealth Medical Center program in Cleveland, Ohio. She graduated from Northeast Ohio Medical University.

Nicole Minckas, MSc, is a researcher at the Institute for Global Health, University College London (UCL) in England. She has served as a teaching assistant for research methods and public policy courses at the University La Matanza in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and for global health research methods and evidence courses at UCL. Her research focuses on maternal and reproductive health with an emphasis on prevention strategies and substandard clinical care during childbirth. She has a special interest in reproductive health rights and gender-based violence prevention.

Pasquale Patrizio, MD, MBE, is a professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, where he also is director of the Yale Fertility Center and Fertility Preservation Program and serves as a bioethicist on the faculty at the Yale Center for Bioethics. Dr. Patrizio has published extensively on a variety of topics dealing with assisted reproduction. His current research areas involve methods to improve IVF results and to expand access to care by minimizing IVF costs and by better insurance coverage not only for infertility but also for medical conditions leading to infertility.

Nicholas Rubashkin, MD, MA, is an assistant clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive health sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, where he is also a PhD candidate in global health sciences. His research interests include the cultural and economic drivers of unnecessary obstetric procedures, person-centered care, and the role of the law in obstetric practice. He is a co-editor of and a contributor to What I Learned in Medical School: Personal Stories of Young Doctors (University of California Press, 2004).

Scott Schweikart, JD, MBE, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethics and Judicial Affairs in Chicago, where he is also the legal editor for the AMA Journal of Ethics. Previously, he worked as an attorney editor and reference attorney at Thomson Reuters and practiced law in Chicago. Mr. Schweikart earned his master of bioethics degree from the University of Pennsylvania and his law degree from Case Western Reserve University. He has research interests in health law, health policy, and bioethics, particularly reproductive ethics.

Jonas J. Swartz, MD, MPH, is a clinical fellow in family planning at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. He did his residency training at Oregon Health & Sciences University and his research interests include contraception coverage, abortion policy, health reform, and immigration.

Claire Wendland, MD, PhD, is a professor in the departments of anthropology and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Previously, she worked as an obstetrician-gynecologist on the Navajo reservation before returning to graduate school for a PhD in cultural anthropology. Her current research explores explanations for maternal death in Malawi, a context in which mortality rates are very high while the uncertainties surrounding any given death are substantial.

Sara Whetstone, MD, MHS, is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. Her long-term commitment to improving the health and well-being of women from underserved communities in the US began as an undergraduate at Brown University, where she majored in community health. It continues today in her work as a faculty member and assistant ob/gyn residency director, developing didactic and community-based experiences for residents. She is currently participating in the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Scholars and Leaders Program to advance these efforts in ob/gyn training nationally.