AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. May 2018, Volume 20, Number 5: 520-523.
doi: 10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.5.ctrb1-1805.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: Trauma Surgery Ethics

Theme Issue Editor

Sara Scarlet, MD, is a fifth-year general surgery resident and member of the hospital ethics committee at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is currently pursuing advanced training in surgical ethics at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. Her interests include moral distress among health care professionals, the ethics of correctional health care, and ethics education for surgeon trainees.

Contributors

Rajesh Aggarwal, MD, PhD, is the senior vice president for strategic business development and a professor of bariatric/minimally invasive surgery at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He seeks to transform health care through deliberate and purposeful engagement with industry.

Peter Angelos, MD, PhD, is the Linda Kohler Anderson Professor of Surgery and the chief of endocrine surgery at the University of Chicago. Recognized expert in medical ethics, he serves as the associate director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. He has written widely on ethical issues in surgical practice and on how to best teach medical ethics to surgical residents.

Alec Beekley, MD, is a professor of surgery at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. His practice focuses on general and bariatric surgery as well as trauma and critical care.

Danielle Hahn Chaet, MSB, is a research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Her work involves researching, developing, and disseminating ethics policy and analyzing current issues and opinions in bioethics. She obtained her master of science degree in bioethics, with a focus on clinical policy and clinical ethics consultation, from the joint program of Union Graduate College and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Bradley M. Dennis, MD, is a trauma and acute care surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, where he is also the director of the trauma performance improvement program. His research interests include standardization of care in acute care surgery, chest trauma, and outcomes for emergency general surgery.

Sandra R. DiBrito, MD, is a general surgery resident at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and a PhD candidate in clinical investigations at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. Her research focuses primarily on clinical outcomes, quality improvement, and surgical education. Following her PhD, she intends to pursue a trauma/acute care surgery fellowship.

Elizabeth B. Dreesen, MD, is a trauma surgeon and the chief of the General and Acute Care Surgery Division of the Department of Surgery at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her surgical residency at the New England Deaconess Hospital and a fellowship in trauma and critical care at the University of Maryland.

Michael B. Greene, PhD, is a senior fellow at the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He also serves as chair of the Violence Prevention Workgroup at the National Prevention Science Coalition. He has written and lectured extensively on the topic of youth and school violence.

Adil Haider, MD, MPH, is a trauma surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Kessler Director of the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Harvard Medical School in Boston. His research focuses on the effects of race, sex, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status on health care disparities.

Macey L. Henderson, JD, PhD, is an assistant professor of surgery in the Department of Surgery in the Division of Transplantation at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, with a joint appointment in the Department of Acute and Chronic Care at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Dr. Henderson is also a member of the board of directors for the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network and the United Network for Organ Sharing. Her research focuses on organ donation and transplantation, health policy, and technological innovations in patient-oriented care and research.

Christian Jones, MD, MS, is an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. As an acute care surgeon, Dr. Jones strives to deliver appropriate acute care to patients with surgical diseases and effectively educate others to do the same.

Benny L. Joyner, Jr., MD, MPH, is an associate professor of pediatrics, anesthesiology, and social medicine and a pediatric intensivist at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He currently serves as the chief of the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine and vice chair for hospital inpatient services and is also one of the lead ethics consultants on the UNC Medical Center Hospital Ethics Committee.

Heather J. Logghe, MD, is a surgical research fellow at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. She founded the #ILookLikeASurgeon social media movement and is passionate about increasing diversity in surgery.

David B. Nance, JD, grew up in Urbana, Illinois and currently lives in Madison, Wisconsin. Educated at University of Wisconsin-Madison, he worked for many years for the Wisconsin Labor and Industry Review Commission in adjudication of employment law issues. Now retired, he continues to pursue photography as one of his avocations.

Allan B. Peetz, MD, is a trauma and critical care surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, where he is also a member of the affiliated faculty in the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society. Dr. Peetz’s research focuses on ethical issues in trauma surgery.

Charles Ransford, MPP, is the senior director of science and policy at Cure Violence, where he is responsible for all policy, research, and communications.

Selwyn O. Rogers Jr., MD, MPH, is the chief of trauma and acute care surgery at the University of Chicago, where he is also the director of the new trauma center, which opens May 2018.

Tyler Rouse, MD, is a physician practicing in Stratford, Ontario, Canada. He is the creator and producer of the podcast series, Legends of Surgery, covering a variety of topics on the history of modern surgery.

Gary Slutkin, MD, is a physician, epidemiologist, infectious disease control specialist, and the founder and executive director of Cure Violence. He is also a professor of epidemiology and international health at University of Illinois at Chicago. He formerly served as medical director for the tuberculosis program for the San Francisco Health Department (1981-1985), where he learned infectious disease control methods and worked for the World Health Organization (1987 to 1994) reversing epidemics, including being principally responsible for supporting Uganda’s AIDS program.

Ashley Suah, MD, is a general surgery resident at the University of Chicago. Her main interest related to surgical ethics involves the relationship between the trauma surgeon and the patient who has been subjected to violence. Specifically, she seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the stance surgeons take regarding the pathogenesis of urban trauma beyond the operating room and intensive care unit.

Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, is a professor in the Department of Surgery and the Program in Trauma at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. He also serves as director of the Surgical Intensive Care Unit and the Center for Critical Care and Trauma Education at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, part of the University of Maryland Medical Center. His research focuses on resuscitation from trauma and hemorrhagic shock, with a particular focus on therapeutic hypothermia.

Matthew Traylor is a third-year medical student in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida, who is interested in emergency medicine. He is a graduate of Vanderbilt University, where he studied philosophy.

Daria Zvetina is the director of grants at Cure Violence, where she provides human services program design and implementation, government and foundation proposal development, research, writing, editing, and technical assistance.