Virtual Mentor

Virtual Mentor. August 2014, Volume 16, Number 8: 589-670.

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August 2014 Contents

The Humanities in Medical Education

Ethics Poll

Do you think the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), with its emphasis on acquired knowledge in science and math, is an effective way to screen medical school applicants?
Yes. Remembering what you learn is critical in medicine.
Yes. It is an accurate predictor of success in medical school.
It should be one factor but should be given less importance than it now has in admissions decisions.
No. It weeds out potentially good doctors who are not good test-takers.
No. It is unfair to those who cannot afford to take expensive MCAT-preparation classes.

Many medical educators advocate including study of the humanities (e.g., art, literature, history, philosophy, religion, or other nonscience courses) as a required part of medical school curricula. Which of the following best describes what you think about this idea?
Such coursework should be required. It takes more than science to be a competent, compassionate physician.
Sounds okay. Can't see how such study could be harmful to anyone.
Good idea if there is time in the curriculum. Medical science coursework must take priority.
Medical students should pursue interests in those fields on their own, outside of the formal curriculum.

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From the Editor

Presenting the Case for the Medical Humanities
Samyukta Mullangi
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:592-594.

Educating for Professionalism

Ethics Cases

Fostering Student Engagement in Medical Humanities Courses
Commentary by Carolyn Gaebler and Lisa Soleymani Lehmann
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:595-598.

A Night at the Museum—Helping Residents “See” Their Patients
Commentary by Johanna Shapiro and Joel Shallit
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:599-603.

Do Future Bench Researchers Need Humanities Courses in Medical School?
Commentary by Rimma Osipov
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:604-609.

Medical Education

Applied Medical Humanities: Addressing Vexing Deficits, Promoting Enduring Skills
Joel T. Katz
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:610-613.

FlexMed: A Nontraditional Admissions Program at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
David Muller
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:614-617.

Creating a Space for the Arts and Humanities at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Therese Jones
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:618-621.

Journal Discussion

The Ethical Force of Stories: Narrative Ethics and Beyond
Faith L. Lagay
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:622-625.

State of the Art and Science

Use of Art Making in Treating Older Patients with Dementia
Laura T. Safar
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:626-630.

Law, Policy, and Society

Policy Forum

Expanding Humanities Training beyond Medical School
Nicholas Kluesner
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:631-635.

Medicine and Society

A Complete Medical Education Includes the Arts and Humanities
David S. Jones
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:636-641.

Medical Ethics and the Media: The Value of a Story
Macey L. Henderson and Jennifer Chevinsky
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:642-647.

History, Art, and Narrative

History of Medicine

Music and Medicine: Harnessing Discipline and Creativity
Lisa M. Wong
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:648-651.

Images of Healing and Learning

Tangles: An Illness Narrative in Graphic Form
Sarah Leavitt
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:652-655.

Medical Narrative

“The Best of Doctors Go to Hell”: How an Ancient Talmudic Aphorism Can Inform the Study and Practice of Medicine
Andrea Wershof Schwartz
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:656-658.

Resources

Suggested Readings and Resources
PDF
Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:659-667.

About the Contributors
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Virtual Mentor. 2014; 16:668-670.